Elementary School
 

Red Flag Green Flag

The Rape and Abuse Crisis Center is excited to announce that we are currently in the process of updating our Red Flag Green Flag People curricula.  The agencies educators have been working on this project in consult with area school counselors as well as the counselors at our agency.  This initial phase of the project will be completed by the end of 2016 at which time we will be working with curriculum specialists/experts and eventually an illustrator.  When this project is complete the materials will be available for purchase on our web site/page.  The current timeline is to have this completed in the spring of 2017, check back periodically for updates.



TheRed Flag Green Flag® People program is a personal safety program in which early elementary-aged children learn about different kinds of touches, how to recognize potentially harmful situations (especially sexual abuse), assertive responses, and who their “helpers” are. Through the use of a 30-page workbook, students learn about appropriate and inappropriate types of touches…which are referred to as Green Flag or Red Flag touches.


Child sexual and physical abuse is a problem that parents often have difficulty with when talking to their children. It is important to teach children how to prevent or avoid an incident of abuse, but it is hard to do so without frightening them. Therefore, the Red Flag Green Flag® People program provides age-appropriate information to children in a non-threatening manner. Through learning the difference between “green flag” and “red flag” touches, children are equipped with the necessary vocabulary and knowledge to explain their experiences and feelings to those identified as “helpers” (police officers, parents, teachers, etc.). Green flag touches are explained as being those that make a person feel good, happy, and loved. Red flag touches are those that cause a person to feel scared, mixed up, or unhappy.


Through use of the 30-page workbook in a classroom setting, children are exposed to several hypothetical and “what if” situations in which they are asked to identify the scenario as being either a red flag or a green flag situation. Such scenarios cover a range of topics from what to do if a stranger approaches a child and asks them to get in a car, to the difference of “okay” and “not okay” secrets, to internet safety.


Children are taught a three-step method to use in the event they find themselves in a Red Flag situation or if they receive a Red Flag touch. The steps are as follows:


1) Say No

If someone tries to give you a Red Flag touch, say NO in a loud, strong voice.

2) Get Away

If someone tries to give you a Red Flag touch, get away. Run someplace safe where there are other people.

3) Tell a Helper

If someone tries to give you a Red Flag touch, tell someone you trust right away.


The conclusion of the workbook (pages 29 and 30) consists of a brief review of the information covered, and presents a list of helpers for children to bring home and ask their parents to help fill in.


If you have any questions or concerns regarding this program or the information covered during its presentation, please contact Greg at the Rape and Abuse Crisis Center at 701-293-7273 or via email at gregl@raccfm.com


I Wish the Hitting Would Stop

The purpose of the "I Wish the Hitting Would Stop" domestic violence education program is to teach all children in a 4th or 5th grade classroom about the issue of domestic violence and its effects on children. While it is not always possible to stop violence, children will learn ways to try to keep themselves safe and to identify people they can go to for help. They will learn that violence between other people is not their fault and they will learn skills for dealing with their own feelings of fear, sadness, hurt, anger and confusion in a positive way. It is believed the skills learned through this program will be applicable to other incidents of violence; not just domestic violence.


The goals of the program are to explain domestic violence in language and concepts that are age-appropriate and easily understood by 4th or 5th grade students, to give the children permission to talk about violence, and to provide an opportunity for the students to share their feelings and fears in a supportive setting.


The "I Wish the Hitting Would Stop" domestic violence education program objectives for each child participant are to learn:

1) Violence is not OK.

2) When you witness violence, keep yourself safe and stay out of the fight.

3) Don’t keep violence a secret.

4) You have trusted adult helpers you can go to when violence happens.

5) If domestic violence happens in your home, it is not your fault.

6) If domestic violence happens in the home of a friend or classmate, there are things you can do to help:

      a. Don’t keep the problem a secret.

      b. Don’t try to handle the problem alone.

      c. Find a trusted adult to help.

      d. Be a kind and caring friend.


The "I Wish the Hitting Would Stop" domestic violence education program materials consist of a student’s classroom workbook and a video. The video is approximately 13 ½ minutes and is viewed in the classroom. It contains information regarding the issue of domestic violence, highlights the stories of three children who lived in homes with domestic violence, and addresses what can be done to help someone who experiences domestic violence in their home.


In a classroom setting, the "I Wish the Hitting Would Stop" program is presented in the following sequence. The "I Wish the Hitting Would Stop" student workbook is divided into two parts. Pages one through 14 in the student’s workbook introduce, in order, the concepts of respect, disrespect, community violence, and domestic violence. Following completion of page 14, the children’s portion of the video is shown. Pages 15 through 28 in the student’s workbook discuss, in order, the feelings of children living in homes where there is domestic violence, the effects the violence has on them, safety planning, and how to be a friend to someone who is living with domestic violence. The program concludes with a review section.


If you have any questions or concerns regarding this program or the information covered during its presentation, please contact Greg at the Rape and Abuse Crisis Center at 701-293-7273 or via email at gregl@raccfm.com.